Posture correction program

Anterior pelvic tilt

An overview of the anterior pelvic tilt

The anterior pelvic tilt is when the hip flexor muscles known as the Iliacus and Psoas muscles (shown below) located on the front of the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex become tight and over-active, they will pull on the top of pelvis and the lumbar spine of the lower back.  It is easy to see why this is called the anterior pelvic tilt.  This in turn will bring the pelvis forward causing the anterior pelvic tilt.  Posture correction stretches will need to be started to loosen the tight deep hip flexors to allow the pelvis to return to an upright position.

The anterior pelvic tilt can also be caused by an underactive and elongated Gluteus Maximus, Gluteus Medius, and Gluteus Minimus (shown below) located on the back of the lumbo-pelvic-hip complex is not strong, this in turn allow the tight and over-active deep hip flexor muscles to pull the top of the pelvis and lumbar spine of the lower back forward.  This a common problem for the pain in the lower back many people complain of.  Posture correction exercises need to be implemented to strengthen the Gluteus Maximus, the Gluteus Medius, and the Gluteus Minimus to correct the anterior pelvic tilt. Below are more detailed images of the muscles involved.

Iliacus muscles of the deep hip flexors pull on top of pelvis causing anterior pelvic tilt

Iliacus muscles cause anterior pelvic tilt

Iliacus muscles cause anterior pelvic tilt

Anterior (front) view of the Iliacus muscle of the deep hip flexor complex attaches to the front top of the pelvis and to the top of the thigh bone.  When this muscle of the deep hip flexors becomes tight, they pull the top of the pelvis forward causing the anterior pelvic tilt.

Posture correction stretches

In this case, posture correction stretches are needed to correct the anterior pelvic tilt.  As the Iliacus muscles of the deep hip flexors are tight and over-active, a targeted stretching program will greatly help to improve this condition to correct the forward tilted pelvis.

Psoas Major muscles of the deep hip flexors cause anterior pelvic tilt

Psoas Major muscles cause anterior pelvic tilt

Psoas Major muscles cause anterior pelvic tilt

Anterior (front) view of the Psoas Major muscles of the deep hip flexor complex attach to the lumbar spine of the lower back and to the top of the femur (thigh bone). When the Psoas Major muscles of the deep hip flexors become tight and over-active, it will pull the lumbar spine of the lower back forward causing the anterior pelvic tilt. This is a big reason that people will experience lower back pain when these are muscles are too tight.

Posture correction stretches

This is a case where posture correction stretches will be needed to correct the anterior pelvic tilt.  As the Psoas Major muscles of the deep hip flexor complex are tight and over-active, a well targeted posture correction stretching program must be used to correct this condition.

Elongated and Weakened Gluteus Major muscles cause anterior pelvic tilt

Gluteus Maximus causes anterior pelvic tilt

Gluteus Maximus causes anterior pelvic tilt

Posterior (rear) view of the Gluteus Maximus of the Lumbar-Pelvic-Hip complex, this is the better known of the glute muscles.  It attaches in the back of the Lumbar-Pelvic-Hip complex along the Sacrum over along the top-rear of the Femur (Thigh bone).  When this muscle is elongated and weakened from under-use, it will allow the tight hip flexors to pull the pelvis and spine forward causing anterior pelvic tilt.

Posture correction strengthening

This is a case where a posture correction strengthening program needs to be implemented to make the Gluteus Maximus muscle stronger.  A stronger Gluteus Maximus muscle will pull the pelvis back into a normal upright position to correct the problem of the anterior pelvic tilt.

Elongated and Weakened Gluteus Medius muscles cause anterior pelvic tilt

Gluteus Medius causes anterior pelvic tilt

Gluteus Medius causes anterior pelvic tilt

Posterior (rear) view of the Gluteus Medius muscle of the Lumbar-Pelvic-Hip complex, this is one of the least known of the gluteus muscles. It attaches in the back of the Lumbar-Pelvic-Hip complex along the top of the pelvis down to the top-rear of the Femur. When this muscle is weak from little use, it will allow the tight hip flexors to pull the pelvis forward causing anterior pelvic tilt.

Posture correction strengthening

This is another case where a posture correction strengthening program must be used to make this muscle stronger to pull the pelvis back.

Elongated and Weakened Gluteus Minimus muscles cause anterior pelvic tilt

Gluteus Minimus causes anterior pelvic tilt

Gluteus Minimus causes anterior pelvic tilt

Posterior (rear) view of the Gluteus Minumus muscle  is another of the least known of the gluteus muscles. It attaches in the back of the Lumbar-Pelvic-Hip complex in the middle of the pelvis down to the top-rear of the Femur. As this muscle is weak from little use, it will also allow the tight hip flexors to pull the pelvis forward causing anterior pelvic tilt.

Posture correction strengthening

Another typical case where a posture correction strengthening program must be used to make this muscle stronger to pull the pelvis back.
Videos to correct anterior pelvic tilt

Muscle imbalances explained

Correcting muscle imbalances

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One Response to “Anterior pelvic tilt and muscles to correct”

  1. Helen 05. May, 2012 at 9:13 am #

    Very informative article about the anterior pelvic tilt, when you think about it this makes a lot of sense. Good work author!!!

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